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Location, location, location - new research reveals what Aussie property shoppers really want

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Media Release

Published on

Forget the ensuite or the extra car space – new research shows location is still king for Australian homebuyers.

The independent research commissioned by Slater and Gordon Conveyancing Works found Australians ranked proximity to schools, being close to work and public transport links as the three most important factors when property shopping.

Slater and Gordon General Manager Personal Legal Services Lee Bailie said sellers could be wasting their time racing to spruce up their property as the market heats up for the peak spring season period, with the condition of the house rated the least important factor.

“Traditionally, the rule of thumb was ‘first impressions count’,” Mr Bailie said.

“There has always been consensus that a property in good condition was more likely to sell, but this research suggests people are more likely to look past that.

“It’s also possibly reflective of the renovating trend we are seeing.  People are buying with an eye to putting their own stamp on the property anyway. 

“That doesn’t mean sellers shouldn’t try to position their property in the best possible light, it’s just that it’s not the most important factor in the decision to buy.”

The number of bedrooms and the neighbourhood round out the bottom three house-hunting criteria.

While Australian women listed schools as their top priority, men who live in a capital city thought proximity to the CBD was more important.

Unsurprisingly, 18-24 year olds who lived in a capital city also wanted to be close to the CBD while those aged between 25-34 and 35-44 said car parking and public transport respectively were potential deal breakers.

Those aged between 45-54 and over the age of 55 wanted to be close to schools.

“This may well be that people in those age groups believe being close to schools will give them a better return on their investment.

“However it may also reflect the increasing number of people who are involved in caring for their grandchildren,” Mr Bailie said.

In the regions, age didn’t come into it with all citing proximity to schools as the most important factor to consider when buying a home.

Sydneysiders’ priorities from most important to least important were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Size of the land
  4. Close to shops
  5. Close to transport
  6. Physical position (i.e. north facing, etc)
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Condition of the property
  9. Number of bedrooms

Melburnians’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Close to transport
  4. Close to shops
  5. Size of the land
  6. Physical position
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Number of bedrooms
  9. Condition of the property

Brisbane residents’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Close to shops
  4. Close to transport
  5. Size of the land
  6. Physical position
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Condition of the property
  9. Number of bedrooms

Canberrans’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Close to transport
  4. Close to shops
  5. Size of the land
  6. The neighbourhood
  7. Physical position
  8. Number of bedrooms
  9. Condition of the property

Perth residents’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to transport
  3. Close to work
  4. Clos to shops
  5. Physical position
  6. Size of the land
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Number of bedrooms
  9. Condition of the property

Adelaide residents’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Close to transport
  4. Close to shops
  5. Size of the land
  6. Physical position
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Number of bedrooms
  9. Condition of the property

Darwin residents’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to shops, work and transport (all ranked equally)
  3. Size of the land
  4. The neighbourhood
  5. Physical position
  6. Condition of the property
  7. Number of bedrooms

Hobart residents’ priorities were:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work and transport (ranked equally)
  3. Close to shops
  4. Size of the land
  5. Physical position
  6. Number of bedrooms
  7. The neighbourhood
  8. Condition of the property

Australians in rural and regional areas listed their priorities as:

  1. Close to schools
  2. Close to work
  3. Close to transport
  4. Close to shops
  5. Size of the land
  6. Number of bedrooms
  7. Physical position
  8. The neighbourhood
  9. Condition of the property

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