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Ride share and food delivery workers aren't classified as employees

The work conditions and safety of ride share and food delivery workers has been under scrutiny recently, after a number of these workers were seriously injured or killed while on the job. But because they’re not classified as employees many do not get the protections and benefits other employees do.

No paid sick leave

Ride share and food delivery workers can be financially disadvantaged if they have to take time off because of injury or illness

No guaranteed access to workers' compensation insurance

Ride share and food delivery workers may be left out of pocket for medical fees and won't get compensation for loss of wages if they can't work because of injury or illness

No automatic super contributions

Ride share and food delivery workers may have less savings at retirement

Slater and Gordon research by Kantar Australia spoke to 250 ride share and food delivery workers and found...

Two thirds (65 per cent) of food delivery workers are concerned about their safety when working.

Motorcyclists are the most concerned, with 84 per cent worried about their own safety while 71 per cent of cyclists said the same.

59 per cent of food delivery riders said they were worried about injuring themselves or becoming ill as a result of the work they do.

Seventy per cent of ride share drivers have worked while sick or injured or know a colleague who has. And 64 per cent of delivery riders said the same.

Sixty-two per cent of 18-29 year old rideshare and food delivery workers have worked, or know a colleague who has worked while sick or injured.

Seventy-one per cent of motorcyclist food delivery drivers said they had worked while sick or injured or knew a colleague that had. Sixty-five per cent said it was very serious and they needed medical treatment or it was slightly serious and they could have benefited from medical treatment.

Nearly half (45 per cent) of migrant ride share and food delivery workers didn’t know they would not receive workers’ compensation insurance when they signed up to gig economy work.

This is compared to 28 per cent of Australian workers who said they did not know they would not receive workers’ compensation either.

More than one third (39 per cent) of ride share and food delivery workers (Australian and migrant backgrounds) aged 18-29 years old didn’t know they would not receive workers’ compensation. While 40 per cent of 30-39 year olds didn’t know and 28 per cent of workers aged 40 and up didn’t know they would not receive workers’ compensation.

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