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Australia’s history of extensive Asbestos use sadly corresponds to the number of patients who have been and continue to be diagnosed with dust diseases. The toll is expected to peak closer to 2020 because of the long latency periods in asbestos-related diseases.

Asbestos litigation thus is a highly specialised field and one of the saddest. To truly understand diseases caused by Asbestos, lawyers need to know the history of asbestos and occupations that were prone to exposure to the material in Australia.

Joanne Wade and Jessica Mackenzie, senior lawyers from our Asbestos Diseases litigation team, attended the Pleural Mesothelioma Education Day held at Revesby Workers Club on May 8, 2017. Here is their account.

Keeping up-to-date with Mesothelioma developments

The Asbestos Diseases Research Institute (ADRI) arranged the day so that patients, families and health professionals along with legal counsels could hear the latest information on symptom management, developments on treatment and living with dignity through the journey of mesothelioma.

We heard from the outgoing director of ADRI, Professor Nico Van Zandwijk who discussed the relationship of asbestos dust and diagnosis of diseases in Australia, whilst the new director of ADRI, Professor Ken Takahashi talked about the continued global use of asbestos and what this means into the future.

We learnt about the exciting research being undertaken at ADRI, leading to clinical trials. We also heard from Associate Professor Brian McCaughan about the role of surgery in the mesothelioma journey, along with Dr. Anthony Linton about current chemotherapy options and developments.

Dr. Judith Lacey spoke passionately about the role of palliative care and its importance in supporting families, carers and patients from the start of the journey.

Developments in research, treatment and clinical trials

The Pleural Mesothelioma Education Day was well supported from members of the community and we all had a great opportunity to hear about the latest information on the journey of mesothelioma. We look forward to hearing about the continued developments and results of ADRI’s research and clinical trials.

Walk for Mesothelioma

The ADRI also held a “Walk for Mesothelioma” to acknowledge people living with mesothelioma and those who have experienced the consequences of this terrible disease.

The 4km. walk was through the grounds of Yaralla Estate and around Majors Bay Reserve at Concord, NSW.

Joanne Wade, Jessica Mackenzie and Nicole Valenti donned their walking shoes on a sunny Sunday morning and were out supporting the Walk for Mesothelioma with about 60 other families, friends, carers, and patients.

The contents of this blog post are considered accurate as at the date of publication. However the applicable laws may be subject to change, thereby affecting the accuracy of the article. The information contained in this blog post is of a general nature only and is not specific to anyone’s personal circumstances. Please seek legal advice before acting on any of the information contained in this post.

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