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While the debate around drunken behaviour will continue, there are steps people can take to avoid trouble when venturing out for the night.

Keeping this in mind, revellers should be able to continue to socialise and have safe, enjoyable nights out without ending up in the Emergency Room.

We all have a responsibility for our actions, but there is also a need for public education and greater awareness about the dangers of consuming excessive amount of alcohol. Should the responsibility also rest with hotels and pubs to ensure your safety?

1. Drink in moderation

Often those who are highly intoxicated are also the most vulnerable. Protect yourself and your mates from being a victim of crime by having your wits about you.

2. Look after yourself and your mates

Understand the warning signs and be conscious of the potential for conflict. Be the better person and simply walk away.

3. Keep away from aggressive and hostile people

Give these people a wide berth and be conscious of their presence. Do not respond in a similar fashion. Remember one brief moment of anger can result in a lifetime of heartache and regret for both victim and perpetrator.

4. If confronted with aggression seek assistance from security or the police immediately

Remember there are no winners in a self-defence situation, there are only survivors and non-survivors!

5. Prior to going out have a plan as to how you will get home (i.e. designated driver, being picked up, taxi or public transport)

Often a great night out can be dampened by the stress and frustration of trying to get home.

6. If you witness aggressive or hostile behaviour or someone being assaulted, it is safer to use your mobile telephone to call 000.

The contents of this blog post are considered accurate as at the date of publication. However the applicable laws may be subject to change, thereby affecting the accuracy of the article. The information contained in this blog post is of a general nature only and is not specific to anyone’s personal circumstances. Please seek legal advice before acting on any of the information contained in this post.

Thank you for your feedback.

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