You web browser may not be properly supported. To use this site and all its features we recommend using the latest versions of Chrome, Safari or Firefox

Slater and Gordon are continuing to service the community during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Click here for more info


Earlier in July 2017, the Government announced a permanent ban on the burners that weigh less than 8kg – following more than 100 injuries and at least 36 house fires caused by the items across Australia. The product has also resulted in three deaths overseas.

Burn victim Emma welcomed the Federal Government ban on table top ethanol burners as she continues to recover from her injuries.

In October 2016, Emma visited a friend’s house after attending a cancer fundraiser when the burner, just lit, fired at her.

Her friends then used a garden hose to put out the flames, which had quickly engulfed her body, causing third-degree burns to her face, neck and chest.

"When the flame came out at me, I remember looking down and trying to pat out the flames and quickly realising they weren’t going out. My friends were just terrified, it was complete chaos. My skin was bubbling and essentially falling off my face.”

Emma was taken to Fiona Stanley Hospital where she was placed in an induced coma, treated in the Intensive Care Unit and later underwent plastic surgery to address the more than 20 per cent of burns to her body.

After six weeks in hospital she was sent home but continues to wear compression bandages and a face mask for at least another year while also receiving laser treatment to help reduce scarring, which will never be completely gone.

She is also unable to return to her chosen profession, real estate.

Emma says the accident had changed her entire life, admitting she was still coming to terms with the accident, which had caused serious angst, depression and loss of confidence.

She said she supported the Federal Government decision, which will hopefully stop others form going through the trauma she has experienced.

“What angers me is that there have already been so many injuries and house fires because of these burners,” she said. “It’s so important that the Government has put a stop this.”

Corporations selling these items will face fines of up to $1.1 million – individuals can receive $220,000 fines.

The contents of this blog post are considered accurate as at the date of publication. However the applicable laws may be subject to change, thereby affecting the accuracy of the article. The information contained in this blog post is of a general nature only and is not specific to anyone’s personal circumstances. Please seek legal advice before acting on any of the information contained in this post.

Thank you for your feedback.

Related blog posts

Compensation Law
30 years of the NSW Dust Diseases Tribunal

On 1 November 1989 Judge John O’Meally sat for the first time in the New South Wales Dust Diseases Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) when it heard its first case. This month, during Asbestos Awareness Month the Tribunal celebrated 30 years of operation. The Tribunal was created by the NSW Parliament after years of long delays in the Supreme Court and District Court which often saw plaintiffs suffering from dust diseases die before their cases could be heard. During the Second Reading Speech on 3 May 1989, Mr Dowd, the then NSW Attorney General said: Honourable members will be aware of the considerable delays that exist in the common law jurisdictions of both the Supreme Court and the...

Asbestos danger sign
Compensation Law
Is it legal to flash your headlights?

You know the old Aussie tradition: see a cop car or unmarked speed camera and flash your headlights to warn other drivers. But is it legal? And when can you use your headlights legally? We give you the basics. The legal purpose of headlights According to Section 215 of the Australian Road Rules (2006), low-beam headlights must be used for driving at night or in hazardous conditions that cause reduced visibility – playing a clear role in avoiding and preventing accidents. In fact, since the introduction of daytime running lamps (DRL) on vehicles in Australia, there has been a reduction of multiple vehicle injury accidents by up to 20 per cent and a reduction of fatal pedestrian accidents...

Car Headlights 628X290
Compensation Law
Abuse law and understanding the National Redress Scheme

The high-profile trial of Cardinal George Pell and his application for leave to appeal against the convictions being accepted by the High Court, as well as the Royal Commission in recent years, have shined a light on sex abuse in Australia. Bravehearts Foundation provides advice and support to those affected by child sexual assault. They provide child protection training and education programs, specialist child sexual assault counselling and support services. We have formed an alliance with Bravehearts Foundation who work very hard to prevent child sexual assault in our society. We have also linked up with Knowmore, who provide legal advice to abuse survivors by arming them with information...

We're here to help

Start your online claim check now. Or, if you have a question, get in touch with our team.